A Biographical Essay on Zukofsky by Mark Scroggins.

Louis Zukofsky is an important American poet. The son of immigrant Russian Jews, he was born into the Jewish ghetto of the Lower East Side of Manhattan in 1904. He is perhaps best-known for “ A”, a monumental poem in 24 parts, and for inventing the term “objectivists” to describe himself and a loose-knit group of avant-garde poets.

Zukofsky did aim at such objective honesty or “care for the detail,” as he put it, but he emphasized that being an Objectivist meant that the poet created a poem as an object, in much the same way.

Prepositions: the collected critical essays of Louis Zukofsky.

Zukofsky's short poetry of the early 1930s, much of which has a distinctly political bent, was not collected until 1941's 55 Poems, published by a small press in Prairie City, Illinois. From Louis Zukofsky and the Poetry of Knowledge.Prepositions: The Collected Critical Essays, published first in 1967 and then in an expanded edition in 1981, was a definitive set of critical statements by Louis Zukofsky, one of the most important poets of the 20th century. These central expositions of Zukofsky's.Louis Zukofsky is the most formally radical poet to emerge among the second-wave modernists who composed in the wake of such first-generation innovators as Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, James Joyce, William Carlos Williams, and Gertrude Stein.


Louis Zukofsky first achieved a reputation in the literary world during the 1920s, when Ezra Pound published his work in Exile. Later he became editor of Poetry, in which, in 1931, he actively promoted the as yet relatively unknown William Carlos Williams and Kenneth Rexroth, among others.Prepositions: The Collected Critical Essays of Louis Zukofsky by Zukofsky, Louis. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of Callifornia Press, 1981. Paperback. Expanded edition. Foreword by Hugh Kenner. Covers are rather scuffed and a little edge-worn. Minor wear and rubbing to spine ends. Light wear to leading corners. Binding is sound and pages are tight throughout.

Mark Scroggins Louis Zukofsky was born on Manhattan's Lower East Side in 1904. Zukofsky's parents, Pinchos (ca. 1860-1950) and Chana Pruss Zukofsky (ca. 1862-1927), were Orthodox Jews from the part of Russia which is now Lithuania; Pinchos immigrated to the United States in 1898, working as.

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Louis Zukofsky (January 23, 1904 - May 12, 1978) was an American poet. As a founder, and the primary theorist, of the Objectivist group of poets, he was an important influence on subsequent generations of poets in America and abroad.

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Reading Zukofsky's 80 Flowers by Michele J. Leggott. 80 Flowers was published in an edition of 80 in 1978, soon after Louis Zukofsky's death, and left at that. I didn't own any of the 80. I first tracked down a library copy of Leggott's book not long after its own publication in 1989, but I didn't read it, really, just her citations.Like Stuart Gilbert in 1930, under cover of criticism.

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Univ of California Pr, 1981. Paperback. Very Good. Prepositions: The Collected Critical Essays, published first in 1967 and th en in an expanded edition in 1981, was a definitive set of critical stateme nts by Louis Zukofsky, one of the most important p.

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Prepositions: The Collected Critical Essays, published first in 1967 and then in an expanded edition in 1981, was a definitive set of critical statements by Louis Zukofsky, one of the most important poets of the 20th century. These central expositions of Zukofsky's own poetics, and enduring examinations of the art of poetry, range over the.

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The objectivist poets were a loose-knit group of second-generation Modernists who emerged in the 1930s. They were mainly American and were influenced by, among others, Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams.The basic tenets of objectivist poetics as defined by Louis Zukofsky were to treat the poem as an object, and to emphasize sincerity, intelligence, and the poet's ability to look clearly at.

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Yet, there is an underlying meaning in his words, a critique of society and its people's place in it. In this essay, I will attempt to realize and then rationalize this meaning by analysis of the symbolism and use of language as they relate to the state of civilized society during the time Zukofsky wrote the poem.

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With an ear tuned to the most delicate musical effects, an eye for exact and heterogeneous details, and a mind bent on experiment, Louis Zukofsky was preeminent among the radical Objectivist poets of the 1930s. This is the first collection to draw on the full range of Zukofsky’s poetry— containing short lyrics, versions of Catullus, and generous selections from “A”, his 24-part “poem.

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The autograph manuscript of Louis Zukofsky’s essay “Charles Reznikoff: Sincerity and Objectification” is dated 4 February 1930.1It was never printed in its entirety. In the fall of 1920, Zukofsky shortened it in manuscript from 27 to 15.

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Taggart closely examines the work of the objectivist poets George Oppen and Louis Zukofsky. Three essays are devoted to each of these poets, providing detailed readings of individual poems and considerations of each poet’s overall achievement.

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